Viewing entries tagged
Visual Communication

        </iframe>" data-provider-name="YouTube"         Why is most marketing designed to make a company NOT stand out in any meaningful way?  I mean, do you ever feel that marketing is stuck in some kind of déjà vu loop? A loop in which nothing rises above the rest, and everyone's repeatedly using the same buzzwords and gimmicks to sell the same thing?  Brands just merge into one another. You can't tell their products apart anymore, and the marketing is all rotten and dull and irrelevant. In the end, you just tune out, fast forward or find another screen to look at. Does that sound familiar?  I think a big part of the problem is that most businesses are afraid—of themselves.  They're afraid because they don't know who they are.  They're afraid because they don't like who they are.  They're afraid because, if the truth got out, their customers wouldn't like who they are.  They're afraid because they'd much rather be like one of their competitors.  So, instead of showing themselves, they hide. Mostly, they hide behind meaningless buzzwords and clichés. The same ones everyone else is hiding behind. And they're happy—as long as they don't have to show any of their own personality or character or values. As long as they don't have to do anything truly original themselves.  You end up with a dizzying din of marketing that, despite all the individual voices, seems like a single voice saying exactly the same thing, over and over again.  That makes it very hard for someone to pick you out and form a bond with you. They can't really hear you or see you.  So, just because another company is successful with its messaging or spec sheet or activities (or at appear to be, at least), being a copycat isn't a good idea.  Instead, be you.    —Roger—     PS—If you'd like to know when we have new videos available, sign up for our newsletter and we'll send them straight to your inbox.

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Why is most marketing designed to make a company NOT stand out in any meaningful way?

I mean, do you ever feel that marketing is stuck in some kind of déjà vu loop? A loop in which nothing rises above the rest, and everyone's using the same buzzwords and gimmicks to sell the same thing?

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      Digging around the internet to learn more about visual alphabets (we all have our quirks), I was drawn deep down an odd rabbit hole. Would it be possible to create a language based purely on visuals that could be understood by everyone? I wondered.  Some people might say we're well on our way. Just look at the growing use of emoji—the icons increasingly used in text and email messages. Think 'smiley face' and you've got it. There is even a semi-official (and completely sinister-sounding) organisation that governs them:  The Unicode Consortium .  The number of emoji is growing. In May of next year, the Consortium will decide which of 74 candidate emoji will be added to the official roster. Among them are 'bacon' and 'avocado'. 'Lying face' (which will presumably double for 'politician') and 'nauseated face' ('voter') shall also be considered.   Speaking of 'lying faces', did you know that  =:o]  is the emoticon (the precursor of the more graphic emoji) for 'Bill Clinton'?  Ronald Reagan is either  ,:-)  or  7:^]   This is John Lennon:  //0-0\\ , though I'm not suggesting he was a politician. Or a lying face.  How far could The Unicode Consortium take this? Could we end up with sufficient emoji to constitute a full language?  It wouldn't be the first time someone has tried. Do you remember Zlango?  Let me refresh your memory.  Zlango was an icon-based language created in the noughties by a company of the same name. The idea was to shorten mobile text messages using a visual vocabulary of 300 or so icons. The language never took hold and the company no longer exists.  However, Zlango did prove how far you could get using only icons. Here is 'Little Red Riding Hood' in Zlango:      </iframe>" data-provider-name=""      Amir Yagil, a director of Zlango, narrated a story of 'Little Red Riding Hood' with its iconic language at the MWC 2008 in Barcelona, Spain. At the time, Zlango had over 1,000,000 users in 12 countries, according to  Aving , the product news agency that filmed this video.         I wonder what that other classic bedtime story  'Go the XXXX to Sleep'  would look like in purely icon form.   —Roger—

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Digging around the internet to learn more about visual alphabets (we all have our quirks), I was drawn deep down a peculiar rabbit hole. Would it be possible to create a language based purely on visuals that could be understood by everyone?

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