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Content Marketing

      Show & Tell’s Pantry of Curiosities Newsletter, 14th June 2019  Hello,  Unmemorable news!  I'm sitting at my home office desk, safe from falling trees*. The tree that was threatening our granny annexe has been safely cut up. (The family has firewood for the winter.) The manly men with chainsaws told me the tree was only being held up by the electricity cable it was resting against. The threat is gone. A happy end.    Stories with happy endings are best for the characters—they are less memorable for the audience.   Is it better to end a story abruptly and sadly?  In other news, Paul       Roger (& Paul & Anne)     * Unless one drops off a passing aeroplane.            Don't Stop ...        </iframe>" data-provider-name="YouTube"         Our [GAB*] Tip     Be brave and unflinching in your endings. People will talk about them for decades.   The Sopranos Way:    Family is love, difficulty & protection. Eat together. Wife. Son. Daughter. And her obstinate car. Remember the good times. Live in the now. Because you never know when the empty seat next to you gives the assassin a clear shot to the end.     *Genuinely Attractive Business            Podcasting is for easing the burden of others  “Your podcast content should not be about you, but about solving your prospects’ problems.”   Steve Lubetkin, Journalist, Podcast Producer, and Author    3 Podcasts that solve problems:   (1)   More or Less: Behind the Stats   (2)   Grazia Life Advice   (3)   Magicians Advice Podcast      We (Roger & Paul) share our "Business Jazz Podcast" weekly:    Here's an extra special episode (even insiders don't know it exists):   "    Th      e Lost Episode    ".      

  

    
       
      
         
          
             
          
             
                  
             
          
             
          

          

         
      
       
    

  


     Roger creates a visual for each episode. Usually, it's a cartoon. It invites people to listen. The Lost Episode never got a cartoon. Will you accept this indulgence instead?   (Bad news is best delivered with a joke?)  :     

  

    
       
      
         
          
             
                  
             
          

          

         
      
       
    

  


          Past work—Dublin and Dún Laoghaire Education and Training Board     

  

    
       
      
         
          
             
                  
             
          

          

         
      
       
    

  


    

  

    
       
      
         
          
             
                  
             
          

          

         
      
       
    

  


       Dublin and Dún Laoghaire Education and Training Board   is where children, teenagers and adults learn. Documentary photography to show genuine pupils and students developing and growing. A commission through   Granite  , who build magnificent websites that make the internet a more pleasing place.           Your next step  Your next step could be the one that brings an end to your story. That's all right. You can tell another one. A new story about your business. A fresh set of images. A second episode of your podcast—maybe even a second season? A weekly newsletter to your customers.   Mata Hari  once asked  Ian Fleming ,  "What happens after James Bond defeats the villain?"    There is always another villain. They don't stop. They never stop. The stories go on.    (If we were Bond villains, we'd want to change the world and relentlessly shoot out newsletters until we won.)   Thank you very much for not closing the door on us.   Have a [GAB] week,      Roger       (and       Anne       and       Paul      )    PS—Villains bend the truth about historical meetings.

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Unmemorable news!

I'm sitting at my home office desk, safe from falling trees*. The tree that was threatening our granny annexe has been safely cut up. (The family has firewood for the winter.) The manly men with chainsaws told me the tree was only being held up by the electricity cable it was resting against. The threat is gone. A happy end.

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      This is frustratingly annoying. There was an Irish band. They had a hit. It was used in a Hollywood movie. You’d know the song if you heard it. The band doesn’t exist anymore.  I can’t remember the name of the band, the song nor the film.  But I do remember meeting one of the band members. He was wearing an outrageously attractive green get up and a hat. He stood out amidst all the other students in the audience I was talking to. They weren’t wearing anything distinctive. (Not a criticism, just an observation—I’m hardly Freddy Mercury myself.) So he caught my eye from the stage.  After my talk, I complimented him on his attractive clothes. I told him I wished I had an appealing signature style of dress. He told me he wanted to open a restaurant in Cork constructed out of shipping containers.  I do remember  Tony Macken ’s name. It’s Tony Macken. We were in a chapter of Business Network International together. Paul and I bumped into him at  Republic of Work  the other week. He was wearing a magnificent green tweed jacket. A very fine garment indeed.  “I tell everyone I bought it at a charity shop,” he said.  His coat was an easy way for us to develop a rich conversation.  There is a point here somewhere. It’s neither of these:    If you present yourself differently from others, it is easier for people (customers, clients) to spot you.    If you have an attractive hook, it is easier for people (customers, clients) to be hooked by you.    We know this. Of course you do. You’re tired of hearing it. (I apologise.)   The question remains: “Why is there so little original business storytelling?”   Is it because we’re not confident enough to be original? If so, let’s agree to give each other permission to put on bananas bonkers clothes. Or at the very least, something colourful.

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This is frustratingly annoying. There was an Irish band. They had a hit. It was used in a Hollywood movie. You’d know the song if you heard it. The band doesn’t exist anymore.

I can’t remember the name of the band, the song nor the film.

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      Show & Tell’s Pantry of Curiosities Newsletter, 7th June 2019           Use your mighty stories to hook their souls  Hello,  Paul is playing the role of "Father of the Groom" at a wedding in Italy this week. I think he will have a speaking part, even though his character doesn't usually have any lines in the script. But Paul is unconventional. That, of course, is the whole appeal.    Convention makes for boring stories and non-stick surfaces.   It's better wear hooks that snag people.  Meanwhile, I'm in Ireland worrying whether my neighbour's tree will collapse on to my mother-in-law's roof. If it does, it will sever a power line and unleash 11,000 volts. I hope the electricity board's chainsaws arrive in time.    Roger (& Paul & Anne)             Don't cross a fighting woman        </iframe>" data-provider-name="YouTube"         Our [GAB*] Tip      Tell stories of how you open doors, walk through doors, make new doors.       The MJ Hegar Way:   Enter the door regardless. Serve & protest. Have a heart on your chest. Resist. Persist. Assist the wasters out the door.    *Genuinely Attractive Business            Podcasting is for building relationships and rebellious minds   “The medium of podcasting and the personal nature of it, the relationship you build with your listeners and the relationship they have with you—they could be just sitting there, chuckling and listening… there’s nothing like that.”   Marc Maron, Host of WTF with Marc Maron    3 Podcasts for Children:  (1)   Good Night Stories for Rebel Girls   (2)   Story Pirates   (3)   What If World     We (Roger & Paul) share our "Business Jazz Podcast" weekly. Here's an episode: "  Be Human or Don't Be At All  ".            Roger creates a visual for each episode. Usually, it's a cartoon. Sometimes, it isn't. It invites people to listen:     

  

    
       
      
         
          
             
                  
             
          

          

         
      
       
    

  


          Past work—iDrive, but you won't hear me say for whom     

  

    
       
      
         
          
             
                  
             
          

          

         
      
       
    

  


     How do you tell your story when security and discretion mean you can't tell your story? By evoking an understanding.   iDrive Group   isn't your average executive and VIP transfer company. They can't show and tell you that, but we hope the story on their website leaves you feeling you are in the safest and most reliable hands.           Your next step  Your next step could be rebellious. Maybe it's a non-conformist way of telling your business story or opening a business relationship?   Albert Einstein  once asked  Coco Chanel ,  "What would your business look like if you were a pirate queen?"    What would you reply? Would you open the door to exploring the idea, or close it shut firmly?    (If we were pirates, we'd pillage the best content ideas and put them in a newsletter for you.)   Thank you very much for opening the door to us.   Have a [GAB] week,      Paul       (and       Anne       and       Roger      )     PS—Pirates invent untruths about historical meetings.

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Paul is playing the role of "Father of the Groom" at a wedding in Italy this week. I think he will have a speaking part, even though his character doesn't usually have any lines in the script. But Paul is unconventional. That, of course, is the whole appeal.
 

Convention makes for boring stories and non-stick surfaces.

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      Content Marketing for Politicians  Almost nobody turned up when councillor  Kieran McCarthy  held his first public clinic. But his second clinic was a roaring success. Here’s how he did it.  Kieran (I don’t really know him at all, having only met him once, so I’m taking bit of a liberty being so informal) is a Cork City councillor. He is a representative of the people. I don’t know whether that makes him a politician as such, but he does have to be reelected every so often and he needs a way to interact with the people of Cork to hear their concerns.  Most politicians (let’s just call him that, inaccurate as it might be) hold clinics, usually at their constituency offices. Kieran did too. It was a disaster. I think one person turned up the first time he held one. Maybe the turnout was even worse: 0.  Kieran is an ardent historian. He writes a blog about Cork’s history:  Cork Heritage . He runs free walking tours. The way he talks about the city makes you want to see the streets through his eyes.  This is what he did. He offered to take people on a free historical walking tour (during which he was also available to hear any concerns about the city—yes: a clinic). Forty people turned up. Or it may have been 60. Maybe more. He did say so, but I’ve forgotten.  The point is this. By changing the wrapper (a free walking tour instead of a constituency office) and by offering valuable content (stories about the city’s past), he was able to attract the audience he wanted to meet and talk with them.  How clever is that?    —Roger—

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Almost nobody turned up when councillor Kieran McCarthy held his first public clinic. But his second clinic was a roaring success. Here’s how he did it.

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      Do you know what a golden plover is?  It's a game bird, i.e. a bird that is shot for sport—though it seems a fairly uneven sport, if you ask me. The odds don't exactly favour the bird.  Or do they?  You see, the plover is quick.  Very  quick—as you would be if someone were trying to shoot you.  Of course, it's not all about incentive. Genetics plays its part too. The plover is built to be a fairly snappy mover. So snappy that, on a hunting trip in Ireland in 1951, Sir Hugh Beaver missed one.  The miss appears to have led to a discussion among his hunting companions about which is the fastest game bird in Europe, the plover or the red grouse. Maybe the question should have been whether or not Sir Hugh was a rotten shot. Regardless, the debate about the birds remained unresolved. No reference book could provide the answer.  Long story short, Sir Hugh reckoned plenty of other arguments were being held along similar lines—most likely in pubs (but probably not about game bird velocity). Fastest this, biggest that, loudest the other. So, he decided a book of records should be created.  Did I mention he was managing director of Guinness Breweries at the time?  In 1954, the first edition of  The Guinness Book of Records  was published. A thousand copies were printed and given away as a marketing initiative. The next year, a hardcover edition was produced and put on sale. It sold brilliantly and became a bestseller.  You roughly know the rest.  Here's the point of this post.  In the mid-1950s, a company created a book bulging with information people found useful and, initially at least, gave it away for free. The book grew to become a household name—respected, sought after and beloved even. Along the way, it helped promote a brand of beer and (I'm guessing here, I don't have any figures) surely drove sales upwards.  These days, this sort of thing is called 'content marketing' and it's often presented as if it's something new. Something of our internet and social media age. It's not.  T he Guinness Book of Records  isn't even the oldest example. The  Michelin Guide  was created in 1900 by the Michelin brothers, who made car tyres. The company they founded still does. The book contained all sorts of useful and practical information for the motorist. It too was given away for free to begin with. By the mid-1920s, it had evolved into a restaurant and hotel guide awarding stars for fine dining.  I'm certain there are even older examples.  The point is that the concept of content marketing isn't new. Companies have been giving away valuable content for free and reaping the rewards for ages.  By the way,  the plover is quicker than the red grouse . It's not even close.    —Roger—

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Do you know what a golden plover is?

It's a game bird, i.e. a bird that is shot for sport—though it seems a fairly uneven sport, if you ask me. The odds don't exactly favour the bird.

Or do they?

You see, the plover is quick. Very quick—as you would be if someone were trying to shoot you.

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